Austin-Healey 3000 | Buyer’s Guide

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In this Hagerty Buyers Guide Rob Sass points out some things to watch out for when contemplating the purchase of an Austin-Healey. It is important to make su…

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Comments

Mickey Bitsko says:

The original B-series 4-cylinder came from a lot of different vehicles. The 6 was used in an ambulance, among lots of other things. It’s not really fair to? say that any of the Austin engines “came from” anything in particular.

The original gallery-type cylinder head was, thankfully, retired in favor of a more modern design. The early 6-cylinder cars were slower than the 4-cylinder ones.

The 4 was a GREAT engine. Torquey and reliable.

Mickey Bitsko says:

The wood dash is often easier to reproduce than to restore, and it’s something that an owner can do himself pretty easily, at home. Just use the original parts as a pattern to cut out new wood. Dark stain, followed by sanding, to make the grain “pop.” Then lots of layers of lacquer, with wet-sanding in between. Go nuts with the lacquer! It’s probably “over-restoring”, but it looks sensational, and the effect you get compared to the effort involved? is incredible.

Mickey Bitsko says:

Love ‘em, but the ultimate Healey, in my mind, is the 2nd generation (and very rare) BN2. It’s? the original “Healey Hundred” (so-named because it could hit an amazing 100 mph) but with a proper 4-speed designed for left-hand drive. (Not the upside-down and backward “three speed”, which was really a RHD 4-speed with 1st locked out.) They are the rarest and most expensive of the production Healeys. (As opposed to the ultra-rare Sebring, which was a racing homologation.)

Pete Groh says:

My 1st car was a 62′ Tri-carb, present car 63′ BJ7. Like the idea of the? roll-up windows.

B Shaw says:

Engine came? from a WWII ambulance, not a dumptruck, no? An evolution of cars from 53 up would be useful here, including the BN7 tri-carbs and valuations… love these cars.

Mark Mederski says:

There’s no doubt the AH is a sexy and fun car, but now overpriced. It’s tractor simple underneath, and not very tough. Front ends are often loose, shimmy. Expensive weird shocks. The motor is a basic OHV, like Chevy has made millions of. Take the same money and buy an E? Type coupe, 61 to 67. DOHC, independent suspension, (torsion bar in front!) inboard brakes, cool chassis construction / design, even sexier styling and much higher performance in so many ways. Another 50% will get you a roadster.

Mike E V says:

I’ve had 2 encounters with AH’s. In high school a close friend had a 55′ 100? “4″, lay down windshield & all. In the Navy 1968, a 1961 healey with a Ford 289. Fast. In 1969 a close friend had a 69 MG”C” with the AH 3000 6 cyl and 4 spd w/elec OD. Cool and fast.

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